Archive for the ‘Libraries’ Category

Libraries and Web 2.0

May 17, 2008

The Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County started a learning program for its employees a few years ago called 23 Things. It was intended to help people learn about new Web technologies that have changed the way we interact with the Web. It was evidently successful, and other libraries followed suit, using the formula and exercises set out by the Charlotte and Mecklenburg County Library.

Their site says that (as of May, 2006) there are over 200 libraries who are using their Web 2.0 (23 things) learning tool. It’s a pretty neat set of exercises. But I have some suggestions for anyone in a library thinking of implementing this program.

  1. Don’t have all your employees sign up for Gmail to be able to use Blogger (which is now owned by Google). They can get a Blogger account with any active e-mail address. When Google sees 300+ or 100+ or even 50+ e-mail accounts being generated, and accessed, from the same IP address, and Blogger accounts instantly created with those accounts they’re going to think one thing: Spammers! Actually they aren’t doing the thinking, they set up bots to capture just those types of events, so they don’t have to think about it. Once you’re flagged as a spammer, forget trying to get the e-mail account unblocked.
  2. Unblock the content you want staff to be able to access. This would be a good time to take a closer look at just what your filter is blocking and whitelist those inocuous sites you want the staff to be able to play with.
  3. A lot has happened since 23 Things first appeared. If you are going to encourage learning technology, don’t limit the discussion and exercises to old technology. Do a little research, hang out at technology conferences, follow technology feeds, talk to a tech-savvy person, and find out what is current and what is coming down the pike. Then change or add to the discussion to make the exercise current and relevant.  Seriously.  Others have already made changes.  You can, too.
  4. If you haven’t already, read The Cluetrain Manifesto, available online or in print.  This really is an absolute must for administrators, whether you’re doing the 23 Things or not.

And, of course, you deserve great commendations for taking this step into Web 2.0.  Welcome!

Advertisements

Code4Lib Journal, Issue 2 now available!

March 24, 2008

Seriously, lots of good stuff:

Code4Lib: More than a journal

Free and Open Source Options for Creating Database-Driven Subject Guides

Using Google Calendar to Manage Library Website Hours

Geocoding LCSH in the Biodiversity Heritage Library

Toward element-level interoperability in bibliographic metadata

Help! A simple method for getting back-up help to the reference desk

Googlizing a Digital Library

Participatory Design of Websites with Web Design Workshops

Quick Lookup Laptops in the Library: Leveraging Linux with a SLAX LiveCD

The ICAP (Interactive Course Assignment Pages) Publishing System

Respect My Authority

Conference Report: Code4LibCon 2008

Whether you are in a public library, academic library, or special library, this issue has something for you. It is hard to pick a favorite among them, but I really like “Quick lookup laptops in the Library,” because it’s about using Linux to leverage old machines in the library.

I gotta say, it’s great being a part of the editorial team, bringing this to the world.

Code4Lib conference

February 23, 2008

I am heading off to another conference, this time to learn instead of teach. Code4Lib 2008 is in Portland, Oregon, next week. I’ll be posting here from the sessions.

If anyone is interested in stacking the deck for next year, I’m not above a shameless plug for a vote for South Florida for next year’s conference. If you have a login account at code4lib.org, go here to vote (note, some firewalls block the port in this url – leave a comment here if you are having problems). If you don’t have a login account at the code4lib site, you can get one here.

Code4Lib Journal now online!

December 17, 2007

The first issue of Code4Lib Journal is now available, thanks to the efforts of Jonathan Rochkind, who spearheaded getting a group of volunteers to put it all together and get it up on the web. The journal’s mission is “to foster community and share information among those interested in the intersection of libraries, technology, and the future.” Jonathan’s Editorial Introduction explains it all.

It is worth taking a look at, and keeping an eye on, whether you are involved in libraries or not. (As an aside, I happen to be one of the editors)

Internet Librarian 2007

November 2, 2007

Back from California, and the IL 2007 Conference. Posts from the sessions are on the NCR Library Sandbox. (Look in the category links for conferences) They are also listed under “Recent Posts” on the right side of the page.

Although I didn’t get to all of the programs I wanted to, I did get to Greg Notess’ Search Engine Strategies, Danny Sullivan’s The Future of Search, and a very fast Next Generation Library Interface presentation by Marshall Breeding during the lunch break. Lots of good stuff all around.