Libraries and Web 2.0

The Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County started a learning program for its employees a few years ago called 23 Things. It was intended to help people learn about new Web technologies that have changed the way we interact with the Web. It was evidently successful, and other libraries followed suit, using the formula and exercises set out by the Charlotte and Mecklenburg County Library.

Their site says that (as of May, 2006) there are over 200 libraries who are using their Web 2.0 (23 things) learning tool. It’s a pretty neat set of exercises. But I have some suggestions for anyone in a library thinking of implementing this program.

  1. Don’t have all your employees sign up for Gmail to be able to use Blogger (which is now owned by Google). They can get a Blogger account with any active e-mail address. When Google sees 300+ or 100+ or even 50+ e-mail accounts being generated, and accessed, from the same IP address, and Blogger accounts instantly created with those accounts they’re going to think one thing: Spammers! Actually they aren’t doing the thinking, they set up bots to capture just those types of events, so they don’t have to think about it. Once you’re flagged as a spammer, forget trying to get the e-mail account unblocked.
  2. Unblock the content you want staff to be able to access. This would be a good time to take a closer look at just what your filter is blocking and whitelist those inocuous sites you want the staff to be able to play with.
  3. A lot has happened since 23 Things first appeared. If you are going to encourage learning technology, don’t limit the discussion and exercises to old technology. Do a little research, hang out at technology conferences, follow technology feeds, talk to a tech-savvy person, and find out what is current and what is coming down the pike. Then change or add to the discussion to make the exercise current and relevant.  Seriously.  Others have already made changes.  You can, too.
  4. If you haven’t already, read The Cluetrain Manifesto, available online or in print.  This really is an absolute must for administrators, whether you’re doing the 23 Things or not.

And, of course, you deserve great commendations for taking this step into Web 2.0.  Welcome!

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3 Responses to “Libraries and Web 2.0”

  1. Terry Says:

    re #3, what would you like to see added?

  2. Carol Bean Says:

    So… you’re going to call me out on that one? :)

    O.K., for starters, how about:

    OpenID
    Google Books
    Browser Plugins
    Planets
    Widgets and web apps
    Social networks like LinkedIn, Facebook, Ning
    Twitter
    Meebo and IRC (well, the latter may be too geeky)
    Web Conferencing
    Portable Apps
    Meetups

    Not that I want to see all of these added, but they represent some of the current and growing trends which I think we should at least be tracking and should be considering for inclusion in a 23 Things type of program.

  3. Soul Says:

    Somehow i missed the point. Probably lost in translation :) Anyway … nice blog to visit.

    cheers, Soul!!

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